The Sacred Antinous - Erotically-charged, Explicitly Illustrated, Queer-Themed Historical Fiction about Antinous and Hadrian
YOU ARE HERE: HOME > SACRED TEXTS > THE EPISTLES OF ANTINOUS > FOUR DAUGHTERS
WEB SACRED ANTINOUS
Sacred Texts
LEGEND TO ILLUSTRATIONS
  CONTAINS X-RATED IMAGES
  CONTAINS R-RATED IMAGES
  CONTAINS G-RATED IMAGES
COMMENTARY
  ~000 Introduction
I - THE YOUNG SCHOOLBOY
  ~001 Arrival at Caelian Hill
  ~002 Life at the Paedagogium
  ~003 Monsters and Heroes
  ~004 The Private Baths
  ~005 The Soaps of Cyprias
  ~006 The Treachery of Gryllus
  ~007 Assurances and Endurances
  ~008 The Demise of Trenus
  ~009 The Surprise Inspection
II - THE COURT PAGE
  ~010 Little Donkey
  ~011 Whispering Hope
  ~012 Epigrams for Antinous
  ~013 Books from Maltinus
  ~014 Little Signals
  ~015 Promotion
  ~016 Juvenalis IX
  ~017 A Frothy Idea
  ~018 Evening on the Riverbank
  ~019 Across the Leagues
  ~020 Unprecedented Access
  ~021 Winged Mercury
  ~022 Dinner Guest
  ~023 Causes of Nausea
  ~024 New Pupil
  ~025 Wax, Soap, and Wool
  ~026 Four Daughters
  ~027 Vitalis Atones
  ~028 Futures and Histories...
  ~029 The Triumph of Desire
  ~030 An Image of Antinous
  ~031 The Ride From Rome
  ~032 The Villa at Tibur
  ~033 The Ride To Rome
  ~034 Praeconina
  ~035 Foolish Carisius
  ~036 The Christian Texts
  ~037 Married Pleasures
  ~038 In Tibur, Alone
  ~039 The End of Corinthus
  ~040 Turning Tables
  ~041 A History & Fantasy...
  ~042 A Sad Collection
  ~043 Rafts in a Raging Sea
  ~044 Rome, Home and History
  ~045 A Caravan of Monologue
  ~046 On Favorinus
  ~047 The Flesh of a Metaphor
  ~048 Disquieting Thoughts
  ~049 Purple Reign
  ~050 The Heart of Numidia
  ~051 Stables of the Palatine
  ~052 Hadrian's Deprivation
  ~053 Transcripts and Categories
  ~054 In the Wake of a Paradox
III - THE IMPERIAL FAVOURITE
  ~055 Father of the Country
  ~056 The First Night with Hadrian
  ~057 A Place in the World
  ~058 Hard Resolution
  ~059 Announcements...
  ~060 Keeping Company
  ~061 The Stallions' Ride
  ~062 The Tour Begins
  ~063 On the Isthmus
  ~064 On Grief
  ~065 The Eleusian Mysteries
  ~066 A Playful Wager
  ~067 The Delights of Athens
  ~068 On Receiving
  ~069 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~070 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~071 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~072 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~073 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~074 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~075 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~076 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~077 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~078 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~079 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~080 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~081 Epistle Coming Soon
IV - THE SEARCHING SOUL
  ~082 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~083 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~084 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~085 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~086 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~087 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~088 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~089 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~090 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~091 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~092 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~093 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~094 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~095 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~096 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~097 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~098 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~099 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~100 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~101 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~102 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~103 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~104 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~105 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~106 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~107 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~108 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~109 Epistle Coming Soon
  ~110 Epistle Coming Soon
Phallic Amulets

Four Daughters

Lysicles

As agreed, Anaxamenos and I arrived yesterday evening at the doorstep of Maltinus, who lives in a very modest house in the Subura district, which is north of Flavian’s crown upon the Oppian hill. On our way there, I told Anaxamenos of the passages I have read in both Martialis and Juvenalis, who have both described the area in less than flattering terms. We laughed at that, for in truth the neighbourhood seems to us to be no different than many of the other places we have walked. That being said, Subura does possess a great many artisan and merchant shops (including a large proportion of booksellers – no wonder Maltinus likes it so much!), and, as far as I can tell, is home to a thick community of Jews who maintain their synagogue near the Esquiline Gate with a very laudable dedication. Furthermore, I mustn’t omit as a particularly endearing feature the forwardness of the prostitutes who hang from the windows of Subura’s brothels. Perhaps this is the reason my favourite moralist believes the district to be so depraved. But the fact of his disapproval is enough to make me appreciate it all the more as a place that brims with the authenticity of human endeavour, and I daresay that both Anaxamenos and I very much appreciate it as a place of good cheer.

We were greeted upon our arrival by Stolo, who is Maltinus’ third daughter, aged six. She was followed only moments later by her mother, Brocca, who smiled widely and warmly, and then ushered us inside. Into the atrium ran Corda, their second daughter (aged ten and one), to greet us very enthusiastically. And then Maltinus entered with his first-born, Palmetta, who is ten and four.

I watched as Anaxamenos was introduced to her, and could tell instantly that he was smitten (something for which you can be assured I mercilessly teased him about on our walk home later that night). Maltinus and Brocca were obviously very pleased by the success of their daughter’s initial meeting with the handsome Anaxamenos, and it soon became clear to both he and I that Palmetta is very much her father’s daughter, for she evinces an intelligent and thoughtful demeanour. She possesses a very delicate face and a great volume of rich, black hair which flows like a waterfall down her back. To observe her head next to the fiery red curls of Anaxamenos is a delightful contrast indeed!

As we were shown to our sofas, I asked after the infant Merula. “But she is sleeping,” said the earnest Stolo. No sooner, however, had she delivered this disappointing news, did she turn to her mother and plead with Brocca to allow her to show off the baby. Brocca agreed, and thus Stolo took me by the hand and led me into the infant’s little room. I peered into the cradle to see her – and I was dazzled, Lysicles! Not simply at this tiny creature who slept so peacefully before me, but at the thought that soon there would be another one – very much her size – who was of my own blood. I gazed with reverence upon the peaceful face, and Stolo took great pride in my softly cooing delight. Until she determined that I had had my fill, and signaled that it was time for us to leave. Once again she took my hand and led me back out into the atrium, where I thanked her for her thoughtfulness at convincing her mother on my behalf. Stolo must have then decided that I was a very worthy fellow, for she did not leave my side for the rest of the supper.

As dinner progressed, Anaxamenos took a very keen and unabashed interest in Palmetta. It got to the point, I think, that Corda was becoming quite jealous of her elder sister and looked to me to provide a complimentary set of attentions. I obliged her as best I could, much to the amusement of Maltinus, who later confided in me that he felt she was still much too young to make a good wife. I felt a considerable relief at that, for Corda, despite her fire and her zeal, struck me still as remarkably immature of heart.

After dinner the women left us and Maltinus, Anaxamenos and I spoke of many things. Maltinus inquired after my soldier pupil, Decentius, and I told him that the man was an avid learner. “I foresee some very quick progress with him,” I said. And then I asked him if I might borrow a small selection of his most elementary books that I could use as practice material for Decentius. Maltinus readily agreed, and sent me home with two volumes (the LXIInd and LXIIIrd) of Titus Livius, From the Founding of the City.

And that was the evening – passed very enjoyably in the company of Maltinus and his delightful family. Had there been drama and intrigue afoot, I suspect this letter would have been much longer. But as it is, it stands as a testament to the beauty of a very uncomplicated man and his remarkably sincere family. Thus, for all my teasing of Anaxamenos and the sudden hardening of his loins at the thought of Palmetta, I have no doubts that, should they pursue a courtship, she shall make him a very fine wife and he to their family shall prove a magnificent son. Perhaps if Corda discovers what it is to be a woman, I shall be just as happy to marry her, and then, by the gods, I shall make Anaxamenos a brother!

I am tired now, and there is little else to say on this matter. I have written in deference to my friend, Anaxamenos, who no doubt at this very moment is frigging himself with the image of Palmetta carved upon the inside of his skull.

And need I say, Lysicles, whose face it shall be that sits upon mine, when I, but moments from now, put myself to bed and take with me into my sleep a modicum of pleasure? Of course not – for something so obvious needs hardly be said, correct? A.

 
Optimythic
The Sacred Antinous is an ongoing work of Historical Fiction, for contemplative and educational purposes.
Site Design & Content Copyright © 2006 - present, Infinitive Ink Limited | Contact
The Sacred Antinous